Misconceptions About Software Testing

GUPTA, Gagan       Posted by GUPTA, Gagan
      Published: June 17, 2021
        |  

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Software testing is an art that's often misunderstood by those who are outside the field - and sometimes even within the realm. Software testing myths have arisen primarily due to the following: - Lack of authoritative facts. - Evolving nature of the industry. - General flaws in human logic.

Software testing begins post-development

Testing after development (TAD) has an increased likelihood of delaying project delivery. Reversely, testing driven development (TDD) caters to greater efficiency during the project development lifecycle and an excellent customer experience in the end product.

Automate All Tests - Manual Testing is Obsolete

Test automation is another operational concept that has suffered from too much binary conversation. It has been hailed as the solution to the bottleneck of functional verification and condemned as an endless sinkhole for development talent that could be producing value-generating code. Once again, there is a spectrum of value to be gained from test automation.
There are test processes that are repetitive, require large scale environment setups and have many minutely detailed steps that beg for automation. Exploratory tests where each test result is used to design and guide the next test are where manual testing shines and automation costs way more than it is worth. While DevOps depends on automating as much test work as possible, user acceptance testing requires a human perspective that cannot yet be economically automated.

Testing is very expensive

Well, so is car insurance. But we need car insurance. Sometimes it is believed and said that, pay less for the testing during the software development and we should pay more for the maintenance or may be correction later. Early testing can save both time and cost in many aspects. However reducing the cost without testing may result in improper design of a software application rendering the product useless. The reality is harsh but true, most projects that cut costs on quality assurance have to spend twice (or more) as much later. Testing during the project gives more information to the team, and it's widely known that data is incredibly important. Launching a product that hasn't been fully tested can have a huge impact on its popularity, it can crash, freeze, some functionalities can stop working, all kinds of issues are possible. But most importantly, if you find bugs after the project is finished you will have to employ developers again to fix them.

Automate All Tests - Manual Testing is Obsolete

The main problem here is that some may think that everything can and should be automated. In fact, we should only automate most boring tests, those that are repeated numerous times with only a small variation, those that can be used with a lot of data as an input - not everything needs to be automated and must not be automated. Don't forget that each test has a cost in development, running and maintenance.

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Misconceptions About Software Testing
Misconceptions About Software Testing

Testing is too time-consuming.

Constrained by budget and time considerations, product owners feel that testing is time-consuming. It is undeniable that proper QA is part of the development process and therefore takes time to do well, but testing by experienced professionals is much faster and yields better results than by non-professionals. In the never-ending battle between risk analysis, meeting deadlines, and managing opportunity costs, it has been proven time and again that proper and efficient software testing is well worth the cost when compared to the alternative. Testing is crucial to ensure that the product works well and is loyal to the business goals, and a well-managed development process can produce not only solid and bug-free software, but also software delivered on time.

Software testing is unnecessary

You might think that this attitude has been turned on its head and no one subscribes to this belief anymore. You'd be wrong. This belief is still strong with many, and yet many more know that software testing is necessary and still attempt to do without. At the risk of alienating readers, let's remind ourselves exactly why we test. We test because testing identifies faults. Removing these faults increases the software quality by increasing the software's potential reliability. Testing is the measurement of software quality, therefore we measure how closely we have achieved quality by testing factors such as correctness, reliability, usability, maintainability, reusability, testability, security etc. In conclusion, if you don't test, you risk sending software out there that is non compliant, non functional and not operational. In short, bad software.

Developers do not test a product

It is untrue to say that developers are only responsible for writing the code. Testing the product is the testing team's responsibility. As contrary to this belief, developers are the one who conduct unit and integration testing on the product and ensure that the product is able to deliver optimum performance before it is handed over to the testing team for thorough testing.

Testers Break Software

Testers don't have a magical bug-insertion tool hidden between the developer's machine and the testing system, but somehow, code that worked just fine for the developer doesn't work for the tester. The reason isn't that the tester broke it. The reason is that the tester did something the developer didn't expect. That might be "running the software on the test system without installing all the prerequisites first" because the developer didn't realize the test system didn't have the prerequisites on it in the first place. It might also be activel y looking for weaknesses. This is also where "but it works on my machine" comes from. On the developer's machine everything that's needed has already been installed, all the configuration is done, and the developer knows what she's doing so her testing usually focuses on what the software should be doing. Or it might be because the new feature the developer just finished interacts with an existing feature the developer didn't realize was linked to their new feature, and the unit test coverage wasn't as good as the developer thought. The point is, there are any number of ways a complex application can break, and in my experience any team will encounter at least one of them at some stage in their careers.

Developers do not test a product

It is untrue to say that developers are only responsible for writing the code. Testing the product is the testing team's responsibility. As contrary to this belief, developers are the one who conduct unit and integration testing on the product and ensure that the product is able to deliver optimum performance before it is handed over to the testing team for thorough testing.

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Testing in Agile is best left to the developers

With Agile and devops blurring the boundaries of the roles of testers and developers, why not let the developers test and save the product owner a ton of money? Why have testers at all? Because testers not only test for functional issues; they bring to the team their knowledge of good quality process, their understanding of business goals, and a broad perspective of the application that developers often miss. They are an important link between the product owners and the technical team, and are an important piece within the overall development team and process.

QA outsourcing partner must guarantee a 100% bug-free software

To conduct a high-standard software testing, analyze the results, and provide with the recommendations to improve the software are the key points a QA outsourcing company does guarantee. The myth is popular among non-technical specialists who take responsibility for the final product quality. But promises like this aren't typical for trusted QA vendors. Endless combination of functional system scenarios are impossible to cover; even automated testing isn't a remedy. The point is that any project requires a strict role division among the QA and development teams. While a QA engineer detects and prioritizes the errors, it is a developer who works on debugging. In fact, product quality reflects the quality of cooperation between QA engineers and programmers.

Quality of the product is the testing team's responsibility

Quality is everybody's responsibility. Ensuring optimum quality of the product is not entirely the testing team's responsibility. The role of testers is to detect bugs and let the stakeholders know about them. It is, then, their responsibility to get those rectified and ensure that the product is not released in the market without fixing these errors.

Developers can avoid the testing process

Developers' awareness of the project and the development processes provide valuable insight that the QA team might otherwise overlook. QA teams provide the added benefit of carrying out testing processes without the detailed knowledge of the developer's craft. The QA team doesn't have the same in-depth knowledge of the construction and design processes carried out by the developers, though they typically have a background in programming. Meanwhile, developers have too close of a perspective to their code to assess the product objectively from the consumer. Each team would approach the testing process from a different perspective, which is why both a necessary in the testing process.

The way to improve the quality of the software is to do lots of testing

Testing to improve quality is like standing on a scale to lose weight. Testing is a measure of quality. The number of defects you find indicates the quality of the product and process. The following aphorism is well understood and frequently repeated in other engineering fields: "You can't test quality into a product". Defects are just a symptom of poor quality, a superficial manifestation. Repairing the defect doesn't effect the underlying quality. No other profession build products of uncontrolled quality then relies on testing (and defect repair) to improve the product quality.

Conclusion

Organizations cannot hire customers, so they hire software test engineers who put products through their paces in on potential Customers behalf. So, to represent customers within an organization - What kind of a hat would you wear - a purple hat, a yellow, a blue, or a white?
Testing is a career which is built with innovative thinking - be passionate about it and be strong enough to make your own choices work!
Testers, Do not pay attention to any of these myths, let's bust them all !!

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Misconceptions About Software Testing
                         



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